Monthly Archives: April 2008

Environmental Politics

In a clear presentation that elucidates the deleterious result of the human’s pollution on the global environment, the way humanity thus reaps its rotting fruits must maintain the only known platform for its basic existence: Earth.

The source of pollution is not just a chimney on the White House, but the parasitic mutualism of international politics that excels in areas as stubbornness and bureaucracy. Both accurate references for Earth’s resume when applying for Mercury and Venus’s position as hot, useless rocks. The major issue is international responsibility for a global issue. For example, “approximately one-quarter of carbon dioxide is caused by deforestation:” (Source A) this issue is primely a consequence of over-farming, something that would not be an issue if countries understand that for all to succeed, aid is naturally required. If inflation is rampant in Congo, and farmers must plant increasingly larger crops – thus clearing twenty square =miles of rainforest –to make a million dollars just to by bread for himself, the international community shouldn’t think a nice zoo to keep displaced animals would suffice. A political problem must be solved in order to facilitate recover of the environment – in the grand effect, and ultimately gallows, of humanity.

While the U.S., China, and Australia have failed at recovering the environment by political means as the Kyoto Protocol (Source C), the other smaller polluters are not able to gain political favor from those prime providers of fundamental ideas of successful countries. After all, how could the U.S. part from its precious gasoline that generates a bulk of its 12% of global carbon emissions (Source E) when nations in the Middle East are such attractive targets for invasion?

Another key factor is realism: a plate cannot be realistically “cleaned” per-se; it must suffice at “mostly-clean” (Source D). Analogously, the international effort to improve political relations must work to “mostly-clean” the environment’s plate. Economics don’t function at 100%, and politicians are inherently stubborn, therefore, the closest we may ever come in contemporary society to carbon-clean is just a matter of washing our hands.